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2005: Southeast Center for Teaching Quality
Analysis of approximately 34,000 survey responses underscores Governor Easley’s asserting that “teaching working conditions are student learning conditions.” This report demonstrates that working conditions are critical to increasing student achievement and retaining teachers.
2005: Southeast Center for Teaching Quality
Findings from this report support the importance of identifying and discussing teacher working conditions. Significant and compelling connections between working conditions and student achievement were documented with this study which includes 15,200 survey responses.
May 2005: ECS National Center for Learning and Citizenship
This database contains questions categorized by national civics standards that have been juried by civic learning experts for their clarity and meaningfulness in relation to the competencies of civic knowledge, skills and dispositions.
2005: American Youth Policy Forum and Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
This report questions the current focus on core academic subjects at the expense of an equally important role: preparing students to be engaged and effective citizens. It also offers a seven-step action plan to help schools refocus on the goal of creating both academically proficient and civically engaged students, and highlights several programs, including school-community partnerships that promote both quality academics and civic engagement.
January 2005: John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
A new national study, the largest of its kind, says America's high schools are leaving the First Amendment behind. In particular, educators are failing to give high school students an appreciation of the rights the First Amendment's guarantees.
December 2004: Corporation for National and Community Service
This report is an evaluation of the long-term impact of AmeriCorps participation on members' civic engagement, education, employment, and life skills. The study compares changes in the attitudes and behaviors of AmeriCorps members over time to those of similarly interested individuals not enrolled in AmeriCorps, controlling for interest in national and community service, member and family demographics, and prior civic engagement.
December 2004: Bureau of Labor Statistics
This survey was first established with a baseline of September 11, 2001 to collect data on volunteerism on an annual basis. The survey on volunteering is collected through a supplement to the Annual Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is a monthly survey of 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nations civilian non-institutional population age 16 and over. This level represents an increase from 59.7 million in the year after 9/11 and from 63.7 million from September 2002 to September 2003. About 64.5 million people or about 28.8 percent of the population age 16 and over, volunteered through or for organizations from September 2003 to September 2004.
November 2004: CIRCLE
This fact sheet presents recent evidence about the impact of civic education classes on increasing students’ civic skills and civic knowledge and draws on information from the IEA Civic Education Study of U.S. students (1999) and the National Household Education Surveys on Youth (1999).
August 2004: CIRCLE
The purpose of this paper is to examine different facets of trust in the political system or civic realm and how they are correlated to the expected civic or political engagement of young people.
April 2004: Education Commission of the States and National Center for Learning and Citizenship
This background paper is designed to help policymakers and education leaders incorporate civic knowledge, skills and attitudes into policies that support effective citizenship education from the early elementary grades through high school.
2003: CIRCLE and Carnegie Corporation of New York
Written and endorsed by more than 50 scholars and education practitioners, this report summarizes the status of and need for civic learning in schools, kindergarten through 12th grade. It analyzes trends in American political and civic engagement; identifies promising approaches to educating students for democracy; and offers recommendations to educators, policymakers, government officials and funders.
September 2003: National Conference of State Legislatures
This public opinion survey shows that young people do not understand the ideals of citizenship; they are disengaged from the political process; they lack the knowledge necessary for effective self-government and their appreciation; and support of American democracy is limited. But there is hope. This report also provides new evidence that civic education makes a big difference in attitudes towards citizenship, knowledge, and civic engagement of young people.
2002: International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement
This report, the second from the IEA Civic Education Study, found that while civic knowledge is important, it is not enough. Tolerance, willingness to participate, and understanding responsibilities as well as rights are important elements of citizenship in democracies. Schools can play a valuable role in offering students places to practice democracy as much as they offer places for learning facts.
March 2002: CIRCLE, Center for Democracy and Citizenship, and the Partnership for Trust in Government at the Council for Excellence in Government
A survey of 1,500 Americans between the ages of 15 and 25 and their views toward civic life and institutions provides analysis of the importance of parental involvement, volunteerism, partisanship and other factors in determining civic engagement provides lessons for candidates and has implications for policy.
September 2002: CIRCLE
A survey of 1,500 Americans between the ages of 15 and 25 and their views toward civic life and institutions provides analysis of the importance of parental involvement, volunteerism, partisanship and other factors in determining civic engagement provides lessons for candidates and has implications for policy.
2001: International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement
This report is the first from the IEA Civic Education Study, the largest and most rigorous study of civic education ever conducted internationally.
2001: The Grantmaker Forum on Community and National Service
This review discusses the definition and measurement of civic engagement, elaborating on the youth involvement in civil society, and provides four approaches to encouraging youth civic engagement, which include civic education, service-learning, political action, and youth development.
April 2001: U.S. Department of Education and the National Center for Education Statistics
This report presents an analysis of U.S. data from the IEA Civic Education Study of the civic knowledge and skills of 14-year old students across 28 countries and their attitudes toward civic issues.
June 2001: U.S. Department of Education and the National Center for Education Statistics
This report, based on findings from the 1998 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), provides a view of students' achievement in civics over the ten-year period from 1988 to 1998.



Last updated: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 | 19:45:25